Latest Casualty of Brexit? Netflix Vanity Projects

A tsunami of U.K. vanity projects have breached our shores (suck it, Brexit). Netflix alone has brought us comedians forcing therapy sessions down our un-amused throats, and recently-ascended A-listers flaunting unchecked-narcissism in our beatific faces.

Oh, reverse colonialism. We never under estimate your powers for hubris:

After Life on Netflix (B+) - Ricky Gervais: Typical, Gervais. Breaks your heart, busts your balls, and serves it up in pint. I liked it.

Turn It Up Charlie on Netflix (B) - Idris Elba: Hmm, Idris, I'd like be your vanity project. Turn is an autobiographical (Elba is a still-practices DJ) remix of The Toy with less racism.

Catastrophe on Prime (A) - Sharon Horgan, Rob Delaney: London-based, Catastrophe is how an American expat and a balls-funny school teacher turn a week-long one night stand into four seasons, three kids, and heartbreaking hilarity.

But what I really wanna talk about is Love Death & Robots on Netflix.

It's an anthropological, animated series from the deft-defucking minds of Tim Miller (Dead Pool), and David Fincher (Fight Club, The Game).

It's Cronenberg-meets-The Matrix, hentai-meets-feminism (look up "hentai" and then delete your browser history immediately).

Each of the 18 Black Mirror-esque episodes last anywhere between 3 to 12 minutes. Like Black Mirror, not every story is a winner, but the myriad CGI and illustration styles will keep you transfixed. They’re breathtaking.

Oh, Netflix, you fickle mistress. For when I sought freedom from your Umbrella Academy betrayal, you entice me back with Love Death & Robots.

God, you are such a bitch.